Q&A with Tim May

29 Jan 2018

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What role has the ACA played in Australian cricket?
The purpose of the ACA has been and always will be, to create a landscape within the sport that not only attracts young athletes to the sport , but offers guidance, representation and education and welfare safety nets for those who choose a professional career in cricket.

ACA's representations to CA reflect those purposes and year by year add to the portfolio of assistance that they can offer athletes. Remuneration and MOU's agreed between ACA and CA obviously are a linchpin in the services that ACA offer to attract athletes, but also the recognition that not all players will be able to successfully make a full-time career of cricket and vocational support should be provided to those players.

What fundamental principles have made the ACA successful?
Its principles of ensuring responsible collective representation of the current players, whether it be for remunerational matters or implementing successful "after cricketing life" career education have been the cornerstone of the ACA - principles that benefit not only future and present cricketers but also those who have built the foundations of the game.

It's been so important that past players are looked after and rewarded for their time in the game.

How important has player unity been throughout the 20-year period?
Any player Association is only as strong as the collective support of players - without such collective support, our Association would lack leverage and consensus.

What opportunities exist for a player now, compared to 20 years ago?
Where do I start?! Firstly, the remuneration that a player can derive, whether she or he be an International or State player, has increased so much that players can now view cricket as a viable vocation; but I think the most valuable service that ACA has provided is the welfare and career emphasis that it offers members.

The transition from professional sport to the "after-life" is a difficult transition; having a responsible and proactive Player Association such as the ACA providing a safety net and education based platform makes the most difficult component of professional sport so much easier for the players who give so much to our sport.

20 years on - how proud are you of the legacy that you created for Australian cricket?

I don't know if pride is the word I would use. 20 years ago I was charged with a responsibility to establish the ACA and represent the players. Together with a small administration team of Paul Marsh and Tarryn Paten we were able to cement our place within the game and ensure those who played the game were well represented.

It was a team effort and praise should be afforded to all involved from our Board members to our administration. They all played an integral function in ensuring that players interests were represented in a responsible and beneficial manner to the game.